A fly press is a type of screw press that uses a flywheel or a pair of fly weights to achieve the downward pressure. The flywheel is weighted, helping to maintain momentum and pressure, reducing the workload for the operator.

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AP Lever 6t fly press on stand
6
AP Lever 6t fly press on stand

Used $1,250 Ex GST

NSW

3m AP Lever 3ton Fly Press
4
3m AP Lever 3ton Fly Press

Used $850 Ex GST

NSW

In Stock
John HEINE screw fly press on stand
10
John HEINE screw fly press on stand

Used $1,363 Ex GST

SA - Delivers Nationally

In Stock
PNEUMATIC PRESS PEDAL CONTROL Metalwork
12
PNEUMATIC PRESS PEDAL CONTROL Metalwork

Used $1,273 Ex GST

SA - Delivers Nationally

In Stock
Screw press - max height 195mm - max width 170mm
12
Screw press - max height 195mm - max width 170mm

Used $599 Ex GST

SA - Delivers Nationally

In Stock
Raleigh HEAVY DUTY FOOT PEDAL PUNCH  press
12
Raleigh HEAVY DUTY FOOT PEDAL PUNCH press

Used $1,363 Ex GST

SA - Delivers Nationally

Hand-operated flywheels are considered to be the simplest of all presses, but are still popular among many hobbyists for their ease of use and lack of power requirements.

Unlike most modern tools, the fly press is completely manual in almost every case, making it a great choice if you're looking to reduce power costs. By utilising the additional weights to maintain momentum of the screw shaft, fly presses are able to press down with a lot of pressure, allowing metals to be punched through relatively easily.

One thing to note, particularly with the larger fly press models, is the potential tilting and shifting of the machine during use. When the tool or die meets the resistance of the metal, the machine will inevitably get feedback, so it's very common for fly presses to shift during use. This is why most models will have a large base, which helps with stability. That said, it's important to consider how you can fasten them in place to help reduce movement and increase safety.

Of course, not all fly presses are large machines. Many smaller models are available for hobbyists or small workshops. These will usually be fastened on a workbench or come with their own work stand as standard.

A popular choice among many hobbyists and professionals using a fly press is to make their own 'tooling'. Not to be confused with items like drill bits or stamps that would usually come with a machine, tooling in this case refers to the setups operators will use to create bends or secure the workpiece in place. While work like punching is easily achievable with a base fly press, more intricate work like bending requires a specialist setup that varies case-by-case.

As with most presses, probably the most important spec to look out for is the tonnage the machine can operate at safely without failure. The type of work you are looking to do will determine the tonnage you need. If you're unsure what ton machine you need, or want to know more, talk to your local dealer or seller about the right fly press for your needs.